https://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/pemPensar en Movimiento: Revista de Ciencias del Ejercicio y la Salud ISSN Impreso: 1409-0724 ISSN electrónico: 1659-4436

Rojas-Valverde, Morera-Castro, Montoya-Rodríguez, and Gutiérrez-Vargas: Demands of two small-sided games of Costa Rican college soccer players1

Demands of two small-sided games of Costa Rican college soccer players1



Introduction

Soccer is probably the most popular sport in the world, with millions of active players globally. As explained by Jones and Drust (2007), soccer performance is a result of the player’s physiological capabilities, psychological and social factors, and technical and tactical skills. Today, this game demands high intensity, in order to execute a dynamic and fast performance (Safania, Alizadeh & Nourshahi, 2011). The demands required in this sport, where high intensity efforts are interspersed with periods of low intensity load (Romero & Fernandez, 2015), require professional field staff to improve their methodologies during training, with the aim of achieving physiological adaptations and performance required by changes in the gameplay dynamics.

Due to the great influence of this discipline, technology has become an essential tool for improving the quality and efficiency of the game. Recent advances to technology resources allow maintaining best controls on training, and get more rigorous and accurate planning and prescription of training loads (Barbero, Vera, & Castagna, 2006; Casamichana & Castellano, 2010).

Currently, technology such as heart rate monitors, lactate analyzers, Global Positioning System (GPS), respiratory rate monitors, remote monitoring thermometers, video analysis, among other devices have facilitated measurements, assessments and monitoring of physiological demands in sport like soccer (Barbero, Barbero, Gomez & Castagna, 2009; Casamichana & Castellano, 2010; Hill-Haas, Dawson, Impellizzeri & Coutts, 2011). These devices allow better control of the training and performance of the players, whether during practice or in official games.

Daneshjoo, Halim, Rahnama and Yusof (2013) and Stolen, Chamari, Castagna and Wisloff (2005) mention that these technological advances allow detecting changes such as variation in game intensity more accurately, in soccer various intermittent actions of high intensity and short duration and aerobic base exercises are combined, causing an impact on the morphological and mechanical lower limb muscles characteristics, such as increased stiffness and muscle tone (Kubo, Kanehisa, Ito & Fukunaga, 2001).

In soccer, the small sided games (SSG) are used as a method to achieve high intensities simulating an official game’s characteristics (Aguilar, Botelho, Lago, Macas, & Sampaio, 2012; Casamichana, Castellano, González, García & García, 2011; Katis & Kellis, 2009; Safania, Alizade & Nourshahi, 2011). This training activity is an adaptation of the real game situation applied in practice, varying the dimensions of the playing field, reducing the number of players participating and modifying official rules, such as the participation of the goalkeeper and duration of physical work (Casamichana & Castellano, 2010; Casamichana & Castellano, 2011; Dellal et al., 2012; Hill-Haas, et al., 2011; Jones & Drust, 2007; Katis & Kellis, 2009; Safania, Alizadeh & Nourshahi, 2011). SSG are a simpler but highly effective and efficient method; the results of studies suggest that this methodology increases the player´s physiological capabilities significantly. Mainly, it seeks to translate the complexity of the game situation at training sessions, through a holistic improvement, where beyond the physical and technical and tactical advances, you must use a fast and efficient decision-making (Dellal et al., 2012).

The use of GPS has been incorporated to control training sessions to quantify the physical and physiological loads that a physical exercise causes, through variables such as heart rate, average speed, impacts and total distance covered by a player, allowing daily, weekly or even full-season volume quantification, for groups and individuals, in real time (Gómez, Pallarés, Diaz & Bradley, 2013).

Due to the necessity for soccer trainers and coaches to control the intensity of training and competition, it is essential to conduct studies focused on determinate the intensity variations depending on pitch dimensions. The purpose of this study was to compare two small-sided games kinematics of Costa Rican college soccer players.

Methodology

Participants

A total of 14 male players (age 20.9 ± 1.92 years, weight 69.6 ± 7.3 kg, height 172 cm ± 6.3) participated. These players were training 3 to 4 times per week and were competing regularly, at least once a week belonging to a college soccer team of Costa Rica, who were in preparation for the 2015 inter-university knockout phase.

All subjects were informed of the details of the experimental procedures and the associated risks and discomforts. Each subject gave written informed consent according to the criteria of the Declaration of Helsinki regarding biomedical research involving human subjects (18th Medical Assembly, 1964; revised 2013 in Fortaleza).

Instruments

Body weight measurement was performed using a digital scale (sensitivity 0.1 kg) (Elite Series BC554, Tanita-Ironman, Illinois, United States) and to know the height of the players a wall stadiometer was used.

To measure kinematic variables as speed and distance, a Global Positioning System (GPS) (SP PRO X II GPSports®, 15Hz, Canberra, Australia) was used. The validity and reliability of 15 Hz GPS devices have been demonstrated by Barbero et al. (2009). According to the authors this equipment has a high speed and sprint tests correlation values (r2= .87, p < .001; r2= .94, p < .001). Likewise, the cumulative maximum speed and the maximum speed reached recorded a low coefficient of variation (CV = 1.7% and 1.2% respectively). In turn, Johnston, Watsford, Kelly, Pine and Spurs. (2014) report acceptable reliability through a temporary test (test, re-test, r= .75). This instrument was used to quantify the variables: average of distance in meter covered per min (m/min), average heart rate (beats/min) and average speed (km/h). Team AMS®, V2.5.4 (GPSports, Camberra, Australia) software was used for information analysis.

To perform the analysis of the information collected by GPS, the distance covered (m) were categorized by intensity of motion according to Di Salvo et al. (2007) in: standing-jogging (0-11 km/h), % low intensity running (11.1-14 km/h), % moderate intensity running (14.119 km/h) and % high intensity running (19.1-23 km/h).

Procedures

An information session with participants and informed consent sign was made. Weight and height were measured for each participant.

Two different SSG conditions were measured on consecutive days, 24 hours apart, and were performed before normal training (7:00 am) and with activation/warm up 10 minutes prior to C1 and C2. Condition 1 (C1) had dimensions of 20x30 meters (600m2 total pitch area - 42.86m2 area per player [APP]) and condition 2 (C2) had 30x40 meters (1200m2 total pitch area - 85.1m2 APP). Both sessions were held on the same pitch (natural turf), with the same players (7vs7, two teams randomly selected and maintained in both conditions), same balls and same total playing time (2x10 min, with 3 minutes’ rest and hydration). Goal lines were 3 meters wide, there weren´t goalkeepers, and there were two balls on each side of the field to maintain the dynamic of the game reducing breaks. The players were asked not perform strenuous exercise at least 24 hours prior to performing both conditions.

Statistical analysis

Results are expressed as means ± standard deviation (SD). Data were tested for normal distribution using the Shapiro-Wilk test. Data of heart rate, distance, speed and % distance covered at standing-jogging, low, moderate and high running intensities was subjected to a 2 (condition) x 2 (period) mixed model ANOVA with an alpha set prior at p < .05. The magnitudes of the differences for all variables were analysed using the omega partial squared (ω p 2 ) for ANOVA analysis and qualitatively categorized as follow ωp 2 = .15 high effect, ωp 2 = .06 moderate effect and ωp 2 = .01 as small effect (Cohen, 1977), this analysis was implemented because ωp 2 is not affected by small size samples (Moncada, Solera & Salazar, 2002). The data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, IBM, SPSS Statistics, V 22.0 Chicago, IL, USA).

Results

Descriptive statistics of the variables by period and condition are shown in Table 1 and 2.

Table 1:

Descriptive statistics of the variables distance, speed and heart rate by period and condition.

1659-4436-pem-15-01-00066-gt1.gif

[i] Source: the Authors.

The 2x2 mixed model ANOVA showed no statistically significant interaction (condition vs period) in distance, F(1, 13): .366, p= .551, ωp 2= 0 (low). Nevertheless, there were significant main effect by condition F(1, 13)= 11.833, p= .002, ωp 2 = 0.27 (high), been C2 higher that C1 in distance, there were not significant difference in main analysis by period

F(1, 13): .068, p= .796, ωp 2= 0 (low).

ANOVA showed no statistically significant interaction (condition vs period) in speed, F(1, 13): .380, p= .543, ωp 2 = 0 (low). Nevertheless, there were significant main effect by condition F(1,13)= 11.833, p= .002, ωp 2 = 0.27 (high), been C2 higher that C1 in speed, there were not significant difference in main analysis by period F(1, 13): .026, p= .872, ωp 2= 0 (low).

Results showed no statistically significant interaction (condition vs period) in heart rate, F(1,13): .009, p= .924, ωp 2 = 0 (low). Nevertheless, there were significant main effect by condition F(1,13)= 6.048, p= .021, ωp 2 = .15 (high), been C1 higher that C2 in heart rate, there were not significant difference in main analysis by period F(1, 13): .2.418 p= .132, ωp 2= .04 (low).

Table 2:

Descriptive statistics of the distance covered (m) by intensity in period and condition.

1659-4436-pem-15-01-00066-gt2.gif

[i] Source: the Authors.

The 2x2 mixed model ANOVA for distance covered based in intensity, showed no statistically interaction in standing-jogging, F(1, 26): .313, p= .581, ωp 2 = 0 (low); low intensity, F(1, 26): .015, p= .904, ωp 2 = 0 (low); moderate intensity, F(1, 26): .537, p= .470, ωp 2 = 0 (low); high intensity, F(1,26): .052, p= .822, ωp 2 = 0 (low). The main effects analysis by condition of this kinematic variables indicated that there were significant differences in: standing-jogging, F(1,26)= 23.639, p= .000, ωp 2 = .45 (high); low intensity, F(1,26)= 7.009, p= .014, ωp 2 = .18 (high); moderate intensity, F(1, 26)= 15.82, p= .000, ωp 2 = .35 (high); and in high intensity, F(1,26)= 13.871, p= .001, ωp 2 = .31 (high). The main effects analysis by period of the distance covered based in intensity indicated there were no significant differences in: standing-jogging, F(1,26)= 1.469, p= .236, ωp 2 = .02 (low); low intensity, F(1,26)= .387, p= .539, ωp 2 = -.02 (low); moderate intensity, F(1,26)= .09, p= .766, ωp 2 = -.03 (low); and in high intensity, F(1,26)= 2.888, p= .101, ωp 2 = .06 (moderate).

Discussion

It is known that at present training methodologies have favored high-intensity work in conditions as close as possible to the competition. Small-sided games have come to meet these intensity requirements (Romero & Fernández, 2014). Because there are multiple interactions, the analysis is made based on the space in square meters each player has to run the game (Febré et al., 2015).

Age, height and weight of the participants in this study are similar to others, e.g.: Castellano, Fernández, Castillo, and Casamichana (2010) with a sample of university young players (20.1 ± 1.2 years, height 176.3 ± 9.9 cm; weight 63.5 ± 8.4 kg) and Vargas, Urkiza, and Gil (2015) who studied the behavior of different variables in players with similar anthropometric data (20.9 ± 1.7 years; 1.80 ± 0.05 cm; 73.1 ± 5.3 kg) during the performance of SSG in training and matches.

The results of this study showed that an increase of pitch dimensions leads to more demanding physical conditions, for example by comparing C1 with C2, the latter has significantly greater differences than C1 in first and second period´s distance covered. The results of meters covered per minute in C1 and C2 are similar to those obtained by other studies of SSG under similar conditions to the current study (Casamichana, San RomanQuintana, Castellano & Calleja-González, 2012, Casamichana & Castellano, 2010, Casamichana, Castellano & Hernández-Mendo, 2014, Hill-Haas, Rowsell, Dawson & Coutts, 2009, Rampinini, et al., 2007).

As for mean speed, there were significant differences between C1 and C2, in the first period and second period, being C2 significantly greater than C1. Previous studies mention that as they increase the dimensions of the pitch, the kinematic requirements (average speed and distance) increase proportionally (Casamichana et al., 2012; Dellal et al., 2012; Nevado-Garrosa & Suarez-Arrones, 2015; Rampinini et al., 2007).

Results of this study suggest differences significantly higher in speed categories by condition, C2 being higher in all categories except in standing-jogging. This means, that there was higher intensity actions in C2. This is clear when observing the significant differences between C1 conditions and C2 not only in low intensity categories but in those that require high intensity and sprints, similar to previously reported by Nevado-Garrosa and Suarez-Arrones (2015), Casamichana, San Roman-Quintana, Castellano and CallejaGonzalez, (2013) and Dellal et al., (2012).

Analyzing the effectiveness of SSG to simulate real game conditions on Costa Ricans soccer players, it is stated that both the C1 and C2 simulate the kinematics and heart rate demands of official matches reported prior in a study with a sample of Brazilian players (Barros, et al., 2007) and Costa Rican players (Gutiérrez-Vargas et al., 2015), and analyses of the players from the South Africa World Cup in 2010 (Clemente, et al., 2013). Thus, the percentage distribution of distance covered by speed-intensity was similar to these prior studies made in 11 vs. 11 conditions (Barros et al., 2007, Gutiérrez-Vargas et al., 2015), which indicate that the higher percentage distance in official pitch dimension is executed at standing-jogging speed.

As for the physiological data, significantly higher differences in C1 compared to C2 were obtained, similar to those reported by Casamichana, et al. (2014) and Casamichana, Castellano, Gonzáles-García, and García (2011). These results are in disagreement with those mentioned by Kelly and Drust (2009) who indicated that heart rate did not vary significantly when running SSG in different pitch dimensions (600m2, 1200m2 and 2500m2). According to Allen, Butterfley, Welsh, and Wood (1998) mean heart rate in a smaller pitch is higher because there is greater participation of players in the activity compared with larger pitch dimensions. Febré et al. (2015) noted that heart rate was significantly lower when playing in a smaller APP (90m2) than when playing in a larger one (150m2 per player), contrary to the present study, where the smaller APP (42.86 m2) resulted in a higher average heart rate than the larger APP (85.71m2).

These results, related to kinematic variables behavior in SSG are relevant because of the extended use of this kind of training methods for soccer teams in Costa Rica and worldwide, providing more information to coaches and staff of what kind of variables they got to change to obtain higher or lower responses in speed, distance or heart rate.

This study confirms the findings of previous studies on the effectiveness of SSG to simulate real game conditions in short periods of time. The results indicated C2 had higher intensities compared to C1 game with lower physiological demand. Likewise, the C2 resembles more accurately matches in official conditions of Costa Rican players.

References

1 

Aguilar, M., Botelho, G., Lago, C., Macas, V., & Sampaio, J. (2012). A review on the effects of soccer small-sided games. Journal of Human Kinetics, 33, 103-113. Retrieved from http://www.johk.pl/volume_33.html

M. Aguilar G. Botelho C. Lago V. Macas J. Sampaio 2012A review on the effects of soccer small-sided gamesJournal of Human Kinetics33103113http://www.johk.pl/volume_33.html

2 

Allen, J.D., Butterfly, R., Welsh, M.A., & Wood, R. (1998). The physical and physiological value of 5-a-side soccer training to 11-a-side match play. Journal of Human Movement Studies, 34(1), 1-19. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/224767111_The_Physical_and_Physiological_Value_of_5-A-Side_Soccer_Training_to_11-A-Side_Match_Play

J.D. Allen R. Butterfly M.A. Welsh R Wood 1998The physical and physiological value of 5-a-side soccer training to 11-a-side match playJournal of Human Movement Studies341119https://www.researchgate.net/publication/224767111_The_Physical_and_Physiological_Value_of_5-A-Side_Soccer_Training_to_11-A-Side_Match_Play

3 

Barbero, J., Vera, J., & Castagna, C. (2006). Cuantificación de la carga de fútbol: Análisis de un juego en Espacio Reducido. Journal PubliCE Premium. Retrieved from http://g-se.com/es/evaluacion-deportiva/articulos/cuantificacion-de-la-carga-enfutbol-analisis-de-un-juego-en-espacio-reducido-783

J. Barbero J. Vera C Castagna 2006Cuantificación de la carga de fútbol: Análisis de un juego en Espacio ReducidoJournal PubliCE Premiumhttp://g-se.com/es/evaluacion-deportiva/articulos/cuantificacion-de-la-carga-enfutbol-analisis-de-un-juego-en-espacio-reducido-783

4 

Barbero, J., Barbero, V., Gómez, M., & Castagna, C. (2009). Análisis cinemático del perfil de actividad en jugadoras infantiles de fútbol mediante tecnología GPS. Kronos Rendimiento en el deporte, 18(14), 35-42. Retrieved from http://abacus.universidadeuropea.es/handle/11268/3257

J. Barbero V. Barbero M. Gómez C. Castagna 2009Análisis cinemático del perfil de actividad en jugadoras infantiles de fútbol mediante tecnología GPSKronos Rendimiento en el deporte18143542http://abacus.universidadeuropea.es/handle/11268/3257

5 

Barros, R., Misuta, M., Menezes, R., Figueroa, P., Moura,F., Cunha, S.,Anido, R., & Leite, R. (2007). Analysis of distance covered by first division Brazilian soccer players obtained with an automatic tracking method. Journal of Sport Science and Medicine, 6, 233-242. Retrieved from http://www.jssm.org/abstresearcha.php?id=jssm-06-233.xml

R. Barros M. Misuta R. Menezes P. Figueroa F. Moura S. Cunha R. Anido R. Leite 2007Analysis of distance covered by first division Brazilian soccer players obtained with an automatic tracking methodJournal of Sport Science and Medicine6233242http://www.jssm.org/abstresearcha.php?id=jssm-06-233.xml

6 

Casamichana, D., & Castellano, J. (2010). Time-motion, heart rate, perceptual and motor behavior demands in small-sides soccer games: Effects of pitch size. Journal of Sports Sciences, 28(14), 1615-1623. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.521168

D. Casamichana J. Castellano 2010Time-motion, heart rate, perceptual and motor behavior demands in small-sides soccer games: Effects of pitch sizeJournal of Sports Sciences281416151623https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.521168

7 

Casamichana, D., Castellano, J., González, A., García, H., & García, J. (2011). Demanda fisiológica en juegos reducidos de fútbol con diferente orientación del espacio. International Journal of Sport Science, 23(7), 141-154. Retrieved from http://www.cafyd.com/REVISTA/02306.pdf

D. Casamichana J. Castellano A. González H. García J. García 2011Demanda fisiológica en juegos reducidos de fútbol con diferente orientación del espacioInternational Journal of Sport Science237141154http://www.cafyd.com/REVISTA/02306.pdf

8 

Casamichana, D. & Castellano, J. (2011). Demandas físicas en jugadores semiprofesionales de fútbol: ¿Se entrena igual que se compite? Revista Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte, 6(17), 121-127. Retrieved from http://www.redalyc.org.una.idm.oclc.org/articulo.oa?id=163022532006.

D. Casamichana J. Castellano 2011Demandas físicas en jugadores semiprofesionales de fútbol: ¿Se entrena igual que se compite?Revista Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte617121127http://www.redalyc.org.una.idm.oclc.org/articulo.oa?id=163022532006

9 

Casamichana, D., Castellano, J., & Castagna, C. (2012). Comparing the Physical Demands of Friendly Matches and Small-Sided Games in Semiprofessional Soccer Players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26(3), 837-843. doi: https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31822a61cf

D. Casamichana J. Castellano C. Castagna 2012Comparing the Physical Demands of Friendly Matches and Small-Sided Games in Semiprofessional Soccer PlayersJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research263837843https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31822a61cf

10 

Casamichana, D., Castellano, J. & Hernández-Mendo, A. (2014). La Teoría de la generalizabilidad aplicada al estudio del perfil físico durante juegos reducidos con diferente orientación del espacio en fútbol. International Journal of Sport Science , 10(37), 194-205. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5232/ricyde2014.03702

D. Casamichana J. Castellano A. Hernández-Mendo 2014La Teoría de la generalizabilidad aplicada al estudio del perfil físico durante juegos reducidos con diferente orientación del espacio en fútbolInternational Journal of Sport Science1037194205http://dx.doi.org/10.5232/ricyde2014.03702

11 

Casamichana, D., San Ramón-Quintana, J., Calleja-González, J., & Castellano, J. (2013). Utilización de la limitación de contactos en el entrenamiento en fútbol: ¿afecta a las demandas físicas y fisiológicas? International Journal of Sport Science , (9)33, 208-221. doi: https://doi.org/10.5232/ricyde2013.03301

D. Casamichana J. San Ramón-Quintana J. Calleja-González J Castellano 2013Utilización de la limitación de contactos en el entrenamiento en fútbol: ¿afecta a las demandas físicas y fisiológicas?International Journal of Sport Science933208221https://doi.org/10.5232/ricyde2013.03301

12 

Casamichana, D., San Ramón-Quintana, J., Castellano, J., &Calleja-González, J. (2012). Demandas físicas y fisiológicas en jugadores absolutos no profesionales durante partidos de fútbol 7: un estudio de caso. Cultura_Ciencia _Deporte, 7(20), 115-123. Retrieved from http://ccd.ucam.edu/index.php/revista/article/view/57

D. Casamichana J. San Ramón-Quintana J. Castellano J. &Calleja-González 2012Demandas físicas y fisiológicas en jugadores absolutos no profesionales durante partidos de fútbol 7: un estudio de casoCultura_Ciencia _Deporte720115123http://ccd.ucam.edu/index.php/revista/article/view/57

13 

Castellano, J., Fernandez, J., Castillo,A., & Casamichana, D. (2010). Fiabilidad intraparticipante de diferentes modelos de diapositivos GPS implementados en un partido de Fútbol 7. Cultura_Ciencia _Deporte , 5(14), 85-95. Retrieved from http://ccd.ucam.edu/index.php/revista/article/view/97

J. Castellano J. Fernandez A. Castillo D. Casamichana 2010Fiabilidad intraparticipante de diferentes modelos de diapositivos GPS implementados en un partido de Fútbol 7Cultura_Ciencia _Deporte5148595http://ccd.ucam.edu/index.php/revista/article/view/97

14 

Clamente, F.,Santos, M., Lourenco, F., Ognyanova, M. & Mendez, R. (2013). Activity Profiles of Soccer Players during The 2010 Word Cup. Journal of Human Kinetics , 38,201-211. Retrieved from http://www.johk.pl/files/johk-vol38-2013-21.pdf

F. Clamente M. Santos F. Lourenco M. Ognyanova R. Mendez 2013Activity Profiles of Soccer Players during The 2010 Word CupJournal of Human Kinetics38201211http://www.johk.pl/files/johk-vol38-2013-21.pdf

15 

Cohen, J. (1977). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.cr/books/about/Statistical_power_analysis_for_the_behav.html?id=AG1qAAAAMAAJ&redir_esc=y

J. Cohen 1977Statistical power analysis for the behavioral scienceshttps://books.google.co.cr/books/about/Statistical_power_analysis_for_the_behav.html?id=AG1qAAAAMAAJ&redir_esc=y

16 

Daneshjoo, A., Halim, A., Rahnama, N., & Yusof, A. (2013). The effects of injury prevention warm-up programmes oh knee strength in male soccer players. Biology of Sport, 30(4), 281-288. doi: https://doi.org/10.5604/20831862.1077554

A. Daneshjoo A. Halim N. Rahnama A. Yusof 2013The effects of injury prevention warm-up programmes oh knee strength in male soccer playersBiology of Sport304281288https://doi.org/10.5604/20831862.1077554

17 

Dellal, A., Owenc, A., Wong, D.P., Krustrup, P., Van Exsel, M., & Mallo, J. (2012). Technical and physical demands of small vs. large sided games in relation to playing position in elite soccer. Human Movement Science, 31(4), 957-969. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2011.08.013

A. Dellal A. Owenc D.P. Wong P. Krustrup M. Van Exsel J. Mallo 2012Technical and physical demands of small vs. large sided games in relation to playing position in elite soccerHuman Movement Science314957969https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2011.08.013

18 

Di Salvo, V., Baron, R., Tschan, H., Calderon, F.J., Bachl, N., & Pigozzi, F. (2007). Preformance characteristics according to playing position in elite soccer. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 28(3), 222-7. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6769686_Performance_Characteristics_According_to_Playing_Position_in_Elite_Soccer

V. Di Salvo R. Baron H. Tschan F.J. Calderon N. Bachl F. Pigozzi 2007Preformance characteristics according to playing position in elite soccerInternational Journal of Sports Medicine283222227https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6769686_Performance_Characteristics_According_to_Playing_Position_in_Elite_Soccer

19 

Febré, R., Chirosa, J., Casamichana, D., Chirosa, I., Martín-Tamayo, I., & Pablos, C. (2015). Influencia de la densidad de jugadores sobre la frecuencia cardiaca y respuestas técnicas en jóvenes jugadores de fútbol. Revista Internacional de Ciencias del Deporte, 11(40). Retrieved from http://www.cafyd.com/REVISTA/ojs/index.php/ricyde/article/view/731

R. Febré J. Chirosa D. Casamichana I. Chirosa I. Martín-Tamayo C. Pablos 2015Influencia de la densidad de jugadores sobre la frecuencia cardiaca y respuestas técnicas en jóvenes jugadores de fútbolRevista Internacional de Ciencias del Deporte1140http://www.cafyd.com/REVISTA/ojs/index.php/ricyde/article/view/731

20 

Gómez, A. J; Pallarés, J; Díaz, A., & Bradley, P. (2013). Cuantífícación de la carga física y psicológica en fútbol profesional: diferencias según el nivel competitivo y efectos sobre el resultado en competición oficial. Revista de Psicología del deporte, 22(2), 463-469. Retrieved from http://www.rpd-online.com/article/view/v22-n2-gomezdiaz-pallares-diaz-bradley

A. J Gómez J Pallarés A., Díaz P. Bradley 2013Cuantífícación de la carga física y psicológica en fútbol profesional: diferencias según el nivel competitivo y efectos sobre el resultado en competición oficialRevista de Psicología del deporte222463469http://www.rpd-online.com/article/view/v22-n2-gomezdiaz-pallares-diaz-bradley

21 

Gutiérrez-Vargas, R., Rojas-Valverde, D., Jiménez-Madrigal, E., Sánchez-Ureña, B., Salas-Naranjo, A., Gutiérrez-Vargas, J.C., & Salazar-Cruz, I. (2015). Parámetros Cinemáticos y Técnicos en Jugadores Jóvenes de fútbol Después de Modificar la Regla del Fuera de Juego (Regla 11). Kronos, 14(2). Retrieved from http://gse.com/es/entrenamiento-en-futbol/articulos/parametros-cinematicos-y-tecnicos-enjugadores-jovenes-de-futbol-despues-de-modificar-la-regla-del-fuera-de-juegoregla-11-1905

R. Gutiérrez-Vargas D. Rojas-Valverde E. Jiménez-Madrigal B. Sánchez-Ureña A. Salas-Naranjo J.C. Gutiérrez-Vargas I. Salazar-Cruz 2015Parámetros Cinemáticos y Técnicos en Jugadores Jóvenes de fútbol Después de Modificar la Regla del Fuera de Juego (Regla 11)Kronos142http://gse.com/es/entrenamiento-en-futbol/articulos/parametros-cinematicos-y-tecnicos-enjugadores-jovenes-de-futbol-despues-de-modificar-la-regla-del-fuera-de-juegoregla-11-1905

22 

Hill-Haas, S., Dawson, B., Impellizzeri, F., & Coutts, A. (2011). Physiology of small sided games training in football. Sports Medicine, 41(3), 199-220. doi: https://doi.org/10.2165/11539740-000000000-00000

S. Hill-Haas B. Dawson F. Impellizzeri A. Coutts 2011Physiology of small sided games training in footballSports Medicine413199220https://doi.org/10.2165/11539740-000000000-00000

23 

Hill-Haas, S., Rowsell, G., Dawson, B., & Coutts, A. J. (2009). Acute physiological responses and time-motion characteristics of two small-sided training regimes in youth soccer players. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 23(1), 111-115. doi: https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31818efc1a

S. Hill-Haas G. Rowsell B. Dawson A. J. Coutts 2009Acute physiological responses and time-motion characteristics of two small-sided training regimes in youth soccer playersThe Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research231111115https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31818efc1a

24 

Johnston, R., Watsford, M., Kelly, S., Matthew, P., & Spurrs, R. (2014). The validity and reliability of 10Hz and 15hz GPs units for assessing athlete movement demands. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research , 28(6),1649-1655. doi: https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000323

R. Johnston M. Watsford S. Kelly P. Matthew R. Spurrs 2014The validity and reliability of 10Hz and 15hz GPs units for assessing athlete movement demandsJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research28616491655https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000323

25 

Jones,S., & Drust, B. (2007). Physiological and technical demands of 4 v 4 and 8 v 8 games in elite youth soccer player. Kinesiology, 39(2), 150-156. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/e85e/6700cb62c0b3630c8f8e52396cc33baf301b.pdf

S. Jones B. Drust 2007Physiological and technical demands of 4 v 4 and 8 v 8 games in elite youth soccer playerKinesiology392150156https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/e85e/6700cb62c0b3630c8f8e52396cc33baf301b.pdf

26 

Katis, A., & Kellis, E. (2009). Effects of small-sided games on physical conditioning and performance in young soccer players. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 8(3), 374-380. Retrieved from http://www.jssm.org/researchjssm-08-374.xml.xml

A. Katis E. Kellis 2009Effects of small-sided games on physical conditioning and performance in young soccer playersJournal of Sports Science and Medicine83374380http://www.jssm.org/researchjssm-08-374.xml.xml

27 

Kelly, D., & Drust, B. (2009). The effect of pitch dimensions on heart rate responses and technical demands of small-sided soccer games in elite players. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12(4), 475-479. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2008.01.010

D. Kelly B. Drust 2009The effect of pitch dimensions on heart rate responses and technical demands of small-sided soccer games in elite playersJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport124475479https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2008.01.010

28 

Kubo, K., Kanehisa, H., Ito, M., & Fukunaha, T. (2001). Effects of isometric training on the elasticity of human tendon structures in vivo. Journal of Aplplied Physiology. 91(1), 26-32. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11408409

K. Kubo H. Kanehisa M. Ito T. Fukunaha 2001Effects of isometric training on the elasticity of human tendon structures in vivoJournal of Aplplied Physiology9112632https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11408409

29 

Moncada, J., Solera, A., Salazar, W. (2002). Fuentes de varianza e indices de varianza explicada en las ciencias del movimiento humano. Pensar en Movimiento: Revista de Ciencias del Ejercicio y la Salud, 2 (2): pp 70-74. doi: https://doi.org/10.15517/pensarmov.v2i2.398

J. Moncada A. Solera W. Salazar 2002Fuentes de varianza e indices de varianza explicada en las ciencias del movimiento humanoPensar en Movimiento: Revista de Ciencias del Ejercicio y la Salud227074https://doi.org/10.15517/pensarmov.v2i2.398

30 

Nevado-Garrosa, F. & Suárez-Arrones, L. (2015). Comparación de las demandas físicas de tareas de fútbol reducido y la competición en jugadoras de fútbol sub 13. Cultura_Ciencia_Deporte, 10 (30), pp. 235-243. Retrieved from http://ccd.ucam.edu/index.php/revista/article/view/592

F. Nevado-Garrosa L. Suárez-Arrones 2015Comparación de las demandas físicas de tareas de fútbol reducido y la competición en jugadoras de fútbol sub 13Cultura_Ciencia_Deporte1030235243http://ccd.ucam.edu/index.php/revista/article/view/592

31 

Rampinini, E., Impellizzeri, F., Castagna, C., Abt, G., Chamari, K., Sassi, A., & Marcora, S. (2007). Factors influencing physiological responses to small-sided soccer games. Journal of Sports Sciences , 25(6), 659-666. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/02640410600811858

E. Rampinini F. Impellizzeri C. Castagna G. Abt K. Chamari A. Sassi S. Marcora 2007Factors influencing physiological responses to small-sided soccer gamesJournal of Sports Sciences256659666https://doi.org/10.1080/02640410600811858

32 

Romero, A. & Fernández, J. (2014). El entrenamiento interválico de alta intensidad (Tesis de Grado). Retrieved from http://dspace.umh.es/bitstream/11000/1911/1/%C3%81ngel%20Gabriel%20Romero%20Ant%C3%B3n.pdf

A. Romero J. Fernández 2014El entrenamiento interválico de alta intensidadGradohttp://dspace.umh.es/bitstream/11000/1911/1/%C3%81ngel%20Gabriel%20Romero%20Ant%C3%B3n.pdf

33 

Safania, A., Alizadeh, R., & Nourshahi, M. (2011). A Comparison of Small- Side Games and Interval Trining on Same Selected Phisycal Fitness Factors in Amateur Soccer Players. Journal of Social Sciences, 7(3), 349-353.doi: https://doi.org/10.3844/jssp.2011.349.353

A. Safania R. Alizadeh M. Nourshahi 2011A Comparison of Small- Side Games and Interval Trining on Same Selected Phisycal Fitness Factors in Amateur Soccer PlayersJournal of Social Sciences73349353https://doi.org/10.3844/jssp.2011.349.353

34 

Stolen, T., Chamari, K., Castagna, C., & Wisloff, U. (2005). Physiology of Soccer. Sports of Medicine, 35(6), 501-536. doi: https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-20053506000004

T. Stolen K. Chamari C. Castagna U. Wisloff 2005Physiology of SoccerSports of Medicine356501536https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-20053506000004

35 

Vargas, A., Urkiza, I. & Gil, S. (2015).Efecto de los partidos de pretemporada en la planificación deportiva: Variabilidad en las sesiones de entrenamiento. Retos, 27, 45-51. Retrieved from https://recyt.fecyt.es/index.php/retos/article/view/34346

A. Vargas I. Urkiza S. Gil 2015Efecto de los partidos de pretemporada en la planificación deportiva: Variabilidad en las sesiones de entrenamientoRetos274551https://recyt.fecyt.es/index.php/retos/article/view/34346

Notes

[3] Original submission in English. Also available in the Spanish-translated version in this journal.



This display is generated from NISO JATS XML with jats-html.xsl. The XSLT engine is libxslt.



Demandas cinemáticas en dos tipos de espacios reducidos en jugadores universitarios de fútbol de Costa Rica



Introducción

El fútbol es probablemente el deporte más popular del mundo, con millones de jugadores activos a nivel mundial. Como lo explican Jones y Drust (2007), el rendimiento en el fútbol es el resultado de las capacidades fisiológicas y psicológicas de los jugadores, factores sociales, y las habilidades técnicas y tácticas. Actualmente, este juego demanda altas intensidades, con el fin de ejecutar un rendimiento dinámico y rápido (Safania, Alizadeh & Nourshahi, 2011). Las demandas exigidas en este deporte, conllevan a que los esfuerzos de alta intensidad se entremezclan con periodos de carga de baja intensidad (Romero, 2015), requiriendo entonces que el personal profesional de campo mejore sus metodologías durante el entrenamiento, con el propósito de lograr adaptaciones fisiológicas y de desempeño requeridos para los cambios en la dinámica del juego.

Debido a la gran influencia de esta disciplina, la tecnología se ha convertido en una herramienta esencial para mejorar la calidad y la eficiencia del juego. Avances recientes en los recursos tecnológicos permiten mantener mejores controles en el entrenamiento y obtener planificaciones y prescripciones más rigurosas y precisas en las cargas de entrenamiento (Barbero, Vera & Castagna, 2006; Casamichana & Castellano, 2010).

Actualmente, la tecnología como monitores de ritmo cardíaco, analizadores de lactato, Sistemas de Posicionamiento Global (GPS), monitores de frecuencia respiratoria, termómetros de monitorización remota, análisis de video, entre otros dispositivos han facilitado las mediciones, evaluaciones y seguimiento de las demandas fisiológicas en deportes como el fútbol (Barbero et al. 2006, Casamichana y Castellano, 2010, Hill-Haas, Dawson, Impellizzeri & Coutts, 2011). Estos dispositivos permiten un mejor control en el entrenamiento y la ejecución de los jugadores, ya sea durante la práctica o en los juegos oficiales.

Daneshjoo, Halim, Rahnama y Yusof (2013) y Stolen, Chamari, Castagna y Wisloff (2005) mencionan que estos avances tecnológicos permiten detectar cambios como variaciones en la intensidad del juego, en el fútbol se combinan varias acciones intermitentes de alta intensidad y de corta duración, y ejercicios de base aeróbica, lo que repercute en las características morfológicas y mecánicas de los miembros inferiores, tales como mayor rigidez y tono muscular (Kubo, Kanehisa, Ito & Fukunaga, 2001).

En el fútbol, los juegos con dimensiones reducidas (SSG) se utilizan como un método para lograr altas intensidades simulando las características de un juego oficial (Aguilar et al.,

2012; Casamichana, Castellano, González, García y García, 2011; Katis & Kellis, 2009; Safania, Alizade & Nourshahi, 2011). Esta actividad de entrenamiento es una adaptación de la situación del juego real aplicada en la práctica, variando las dimensiones del terreno de juego, reduciendo el número de jugadores participantes y modificando las reglas oficiales, como la participación del portero y la duración del trabajo físico (Casamichana & Castilian , 2010; Casamichana y Castellano, 2011; Dellal et al., 2012 ; Hill-Haas, et al., 2011; Jones y Drust, 2007; Katis y Kellis, 2009:Safania, Alizadeh y Nourshahi, 2011). Los SSG son un método simple, aunque altamente efectivo y eficiente; los resultados de los estudios sugieren que esta metodología aumenta significativamente la capacidad fisiológica del jugador. Principalmente, busca traducir la complejidad de la situación de juego a las sesiones de entrenamiento, a través de una mejora holística, donde más allá de los avances físicos y técnicos y tácticos, se debe utilizar una toma de decisiones rápida y eficiente (Dellal et al., 2012).

El uso del GPS ha sido incorporado para controlar las sesiones de entrenamiento, para cuantificar las cargas físicas y fisiológicas que un ejercicio físico causa, a través de variables como la frecuencia cardiaca, la velocidad media, los impactos y la distancia total cubierta por un jugador, permitiendo diariamente, semanalmente o por sesión, la cuantificación del volumen de la estación, para grupos e individuos, en tiempo real (Gómez, Pallarés, Díaz & Bradley, 2013).

Debido a la necesidad que poseen los preparadores fìsicos y entrenadores de fútbol de controlar la intensidad del entrenamiento y la competencia, es esencial realizar estudios que se enfoquen en determinar las variaciones de intensidad dependiendo de las dimensiones de terreno. El propósito de este estudio fue comparar las demandas cinemáticas en dos dimensiones de terreno en jugadores de fútbol universitario de Costa Rica.

Metodología

Participantes

Participaron un total de 14 jugadores masculinos (edad 20,9 ± 1,92 años, peso 69,6 ± 7,3 kg, altura 172 cm ± 6,3). Estos jugadores estaban entrenando de 3 a 4 veces por semana y competían regularmente, al menos una vez a la semana. Pertenecen a un equipo de fútbol universitario de Costa Rica, el cual se encontraba en proceso de preparación para la fase eliminatoria entre universidades, en el 2015.

Todos los sujetos fueron informados de los detalles de los procedimientos experimentales, los riesgos asociados y las incomodidades. Cada sujeto dio su consentimiento informado por escrito según los criterios de la Declaración de Helsinki sobre la investigación biomédica en seres humanos (18ª Asamblea Médica, 1964, revisada en Fortaleza en 2013).

Instrumentos

La medición del peso corporal se realizó utilizando una escala digital (sensibilidad ±0,1 kg) (Serie Elite BC554, Tanita-Ironman, Illinois, Estados Unidos) y para conocer la altura de los jugadores se utilizó un estadiómetro de pared.

Para medir las variables cinemáticas como velocidad y distancia, se utilizó un Sistema de Posicionamiento Global (GPS) (SP PRO X II GPSports®, 15Hz, Canberra, Australia). La validez y fiabilidad de los dispositivos GPS de 15 Hz han sido demostradas por BarberoÁlvarez et al. (2009). Según los autores este equipo tiene una alta correlación en pruebas de velocidad y sprint (r2 = 0,87, p <0,001; r2 = 0,94, p <0,001). Asimismo, la velocidad máxima acumulada y la máxima alcanzaron un bajo coeficiente de variación (CV = 1,7% y 1,2% respectivamente). A su vez, Johnston et al. (2013) reportan confiabilidad aceptable a través de una prueba temporal (test, re-test, r = .75). Este instrumento se utilizó para cuantificar las variables: promedio de la distancia en metros cubiertos por minuto (m / min), frecuencia cardíaca media (latidos / min) y velocidad media (km / h). Se utilizó el software Team AMS®, V2.5.4 (GPSports, Camberra, Australia) para el análisis de la información.

Para realizar el análisis de la información recogida por GPS, la distancia recorrida (m) se clasificó por intensidad de movimiento según Di Salvo et al. en cuatro categorías: caminando y trotando (0-11 km / h), porcentaje de carrera a baja intensidad (11.1-14 km / h), porcentaje de carrera a moderada intensidad (14.1-19 km / h) y porcentaje de carrera a alta intensidad (19.1- 23 km / h).

Procedimientos

Se realizó una sesión informativa con los participantes y se firmó el consentimiento informado. Además, se midió el peso y la altura en cada participante.

Se midieron en días consecutivos dos condiciones de espacios reducidos, con una diferencia de 24 horas, y se realizaron antes del entrenamiento normal (7:00 am) y con una activación / calentamiento 10 minutos antes de C1 y C2. La condición 1 (C1) posee una dimensión de 20x30 metros (600 m2 de área de lanzamiento total - 42.86 m2 de área por jugador [APP]) y la condición 2 (C2) posee 30x40 metros (1200 m2 de área de lanzamiento total - 85.1 m2 APP). Ambas sesiones se realizaron en el mismo terreno (césped natural), con los mismos jugadores (7vs7, dos equipos seleccionados al azar y mantenidos en ambas condiciones), los mismos balones y el mismo tiempo total de juego (2x10 min, con 3 minutos de reposo e hidratación). Las líneas de goles eran de 3 metros de ancho, no había porteros, y había dos balones en cada lado del campo para mantener la dinámica del juego, reduciendo las pausas. Se pidió a los jugadores que no realizaran ejercicio extenuante al menos 24 horas antes de realizar ambas condiciones.

Análisis Estadístico

Los resultados se presentan por medio de promedios ± desviación estándar (DE). Los datos se analizaron para la distribución normal usando la prueba de Shapiro-Wilk. Los datos de la frecuencia cardiaca, la distancia, la velocidad y el porcentaje de distancia recorrida en las intensidades en carrera estática, baja, moderada y alta intensidad se sometieron a un ANOVA de modelo mixto de 2 (condición) x 2 (período) con un alfa previa de p>.05 . Las magnitudes de las diferencias para todas las variables se analizaron usando el cuadrado parcial omega (ωp 2 ) para el análisis de ANOVA, categorización cualitativa como ωp 2 = .15 efecto alto, ωp 2 = .06 efecto moderado y ωp 2 = .01 como efecto pequeño (Cohen, 1977), este análisis se implementó porque ωp 2 no se ve afectado en muestras de tamaño pequeño (Moncada, Solera & Salazar, 2002). El análisis de los datos se realizó utilizando Paquete Estadístico para las Ciencias Sociales (SPSS, IBM, SPSS Statistics, V 22.0 Chicago, IL, EE.UU.).

Resultados

En la Tabla 1 y 2 se presenta la estadística descriptiva de las variables en estudio según periodo y condición.

Tabla 1:

Estadística descriptiva de las variables distancia, velocidad y frecuencia cardíaca según período y condición.

1659-4436-pem-15-01-00066-gt3.gif

[i] Fuente: elaboración propia.

El ANOVA de modelo mixto 2x2 no mostró interacción estadísticamente significativa (condición vs período) en distancia, F(1, 13): .366, p= .551, ωp 2= 0 (bajo). Sin embargo, se encontró un efecto principal significativo según la condición F(1, 13)= 11.833, p= .002, ωp 2 = 0.27 (alto), siendo C2 mayor que C1 en la distancia; no se encontró diferencia significativa en el análisis principal según el período F(1, 13): .068, p= .796, ωp 2= 0 (bajo).

El ANOVA no mostró interacción estadísticamente significativa (condición vs período) en velocidad, F(1, 13): .380, p= .543, ωp 2 = 0 (bajo). Sin embargo, se encontró un efecto principal significativo según la condición F(1,13)= 11.833, p= .002, ωp 2 = 0.27 (alto), siendo C2 mayor que C1 en velocidad; no hubo diferencia significativa en el análisis principal según el período F(1, 13): .026, p= .872, ωp 2= 0 (bajo).

Los resultados no demostraron interacción estadísticamente significativa (condición vs período) en la frecuencia cardíaca, F(1,13): .009, p= .924, ωp 2 = 0 (bajo). Sin embargo, hubo un efecto principal significativo según la condición F(1,13)= 6.048, p= .021, ωp 2 = .15 (alto), siendo C1 mayor que C2 en la frecuencia cardíaca; no se encontró diferencia significativa en el análisis principal según el período F(1, 13): .2.418 p= .132, ωp 2= .04 (bajo).

Tabla 2:

Estadística descriptiva de la distancia recorrida (m) según la intensidad en período y la condición.

1659-4436-pem-15-01-00066-gt4.gif

[i] Fuente: elaboración propia.

El ANOVA modelo mixto 2x2 para la distancia recorrida en base a la intensidad, no mostró interacción estadística en la categoría caminando y trotando, F(1, 26): .313, p= .581, ωp 2 = 0 (bajo); carrera a Baja intensidad, F(1, 26): .015, p= .904, ωp 2 = 0 (bajo); carrera a Intensidad moderada, F(1, 26): .537, p= .470, ωp 2 = 0 (bajo); carrera a Alta intensidad, F(1,26): .052, p= .822, ωp 2 = 0 (bajo). El análisis de los efectos principales según la condición de estas variables cinemáticas indicó diferencias significativas en: caminando y trotando, F(1,26)= 23.639, p= .000, ωp 2 = .45 (alto); carrera a Baja intensidad, F(1,26)= 7.009, p= .014, ωp 2 = .18 (alto); carrera a Intensidad moderada, F(1, 26)= 15.82, p= .000, ωp 2 = .35 (alto); carrera a alta intensidad, F(1,26)= 13.871, p= .001, ωp 2 = .31 (alto). El análisis de los efectos principales según el período de la distancia recorrida con base a la intensidad indicó que no hay diferencias significativas en: caminando y trotando, F(1,26)= 1.469, p= .236, ωp 2 = .02 (bajo); carrera a Baja intensidad, F(1,26)= .387, p= .539, ωp 2 = -.02 (bajo); carrera a Intensidad moderada, F(1,26)= .09, p= .766, ωp 2 = -.03 (bajo); carrera a alta intensidad, F(1,26)= 2.888, p= .101, ωp 2 = .06 (moderado).

Discusión

Se sabe que en la actualidad las metodologías de formación han favorecido trabajos de alta intensidad en condiciones que se asemejen a la competencia. Los juegos en dimensiones reducidas han llegado a cumplir con estos requisitos de intensidad (Romero & Fernández, 2014). Debido a que hay múltiples interacciones, el análisis se hace sobre la base del espacio en metros cuadrados que cada jugador tiene que correr en el juego (Febré et al., 2015).

La edad, la talla y el peso de los participantes en este estudio son similares a otros: Castellano, Fernández, Castillo y Casamichana (2010) con una muestra de jóvenes universitarios (20,1 ± 1,2 años, altura 176,3 ± 9,9 cm y peso 63,5 ± 8,4 kg) y Vargas, Urkiza y Gil (2015) que estudiaron el comportamiento de diferentes variables en jugadores con datos antropométricos similares (20,9 ± 1,7 años, 1,80 ± 0,05 cm, 73,1 ± 5,3 kg) durante el desempeño de SSG en entrenamiento y partidos.

Los resultados de este estudio demostraron que un aumento de las dimensiones del terreno conduce a condiciones físicas más exigentes, por ejemplo, comparando C1 con C2, este último tiene diferencias significativamente mayores que C1 en la distancia recorrida en el primero y segundo período. Los resultados de los metros recorridos por minuto en C1 y C2 son similares a los obtenidos por otros estudios de SSG en condiciones similares al presente estudio (Casamichana et al., 2012, Casamichana y Castilla, 2010, Casamichana, San Roman-Quintana, Calleja -Gonzales & Castellano, 2014, Hill-Hass et al., 2009, Rampinini et al., 2007).

En cuanto a la velocidad media, hubo diferencias significativas entre C1 y C2, en el primer período y segundo período, siendo C2 significativamente mayor que C1. Estudios anteriores mencionan que a medida que aumentan las dimensiones del terreno, los requerimientos cinemáticos (velocidad y distancia promedio) aumentan proporcionalmente (Casamichana et al., 2012, Dellal et al., 2012, Nevado Garrosa y Suarez Arrones, 2015, Rampini Et al., 2007).

Los resultados de este estudio sugieren diferencias significativas más altas en las categorías de velocidad según la condición, siendo C2 mayor en todas las categorías, excepto en la categoría caminando y trotando. Esto significa que hubo acciones de mayor intensidad en C2. Siendo claro cuando se observan las diferencias significativas entre las condiciones C1 y C2 no sólo en las categorías de carrera a baja intensidad, sino en aquellas que requieren alta intensidad y velocidad, similares a las reportadas previamente por Nevado-Garrosa y

Suarez-Arrones (2015), Casamichana, San Roman-Quintana, Castellano and CallejaGonzalez, (2013) y Dellal et al., (2012).

Analizando la efectividad de SSG para simular condiciones reales de juego en jugadores de fútbol costarricenses, se afirma que tanto el C1 como C2 simulan las demandas cinemáticas y las demandas de frecuencia cardiaca de los partidos oficiales reportados previamente en un estudio con una muestra de jugadores brasileños (Barros, et 2007) y los jugadores costarricenses (Gutiérrez-Vargas et al., 2015), y el análisis de los jugadores de la Copa Mundial de Sudáfrica 2010 (Clemente et al., 2013). Por lo tanto, la distribución porcentual de la distancia recorrida por intensidad de velocidad fue similar a los estudios previos realizados en 11 vs 11 (Barros et al., 2007, Gutiérrez-Vargas et al., 2015), lo que indica que el mayor porcentaje de distancia en la dimensión de terreno oficial se ejecuta a la velocidad de detenido-trotando.

En cuanto a los datos fisiológicos, se obtuvieron diferencias significativamente mayores en C1 en comparación con C2, similares a Casamichana, San Roman-Quintana, Calleja-Gonzáles y Castellano (2014) y Casamichana, Castellano, Gonzales-García y García). Estos resultados están en contraposición con los mencionados por Kelly y Drust (2009) que indicaron, que la frecuencia cardiaca no varió significativamente al ejecutar SSG en diferentes dimensiones de terreno (600 m2, 1200 m2 y 2500 m2). Según Allen, Butterfley, Welsh y Wood (1998) significan que la frecuencia cardiaca en un terreno menor es mayor porque hay una mayor participación de los jugadores en la actividad en comparación con dimensiones de terreno más grandes. Febré et al. (2015) señalaron que la frecuencia cardíaca era significativamente menor cuando se jugaba en una APP más pequeña (90 m2) que cuando se jugaba en una más grande (150 m2 por jugador), contrariamente al presente estudio, donde la APP más pequeña (42,86 m2) arrojó un promedio de la frecuencia cardíaca mayor que la APP más grande (85.71 m2).

Estos resultados, relacionados con el comportamiento de las variables cinemáticas en SSG son relevantes, debido al uso extendido de este tipo de métodos de entrenamiento para equipos de fútbol en Costa Rica y en todo el mundo, proporcionando más información a los entrenadores y al personal de qué tipo de variables cambiar para obtener respuestas más altas o más bajas en velocidad, distancia o ritmo cardíaco.

Este estudio confirma los hallazgos de estudios previos sobre la efectividad de SSG para simular condiciones reales de juego en cortos períodos de tiempo. Los resultados indicaron que C2 tenía mayores intensidades en comparación con el juego C1 con menor demanda fisiológica. Asimismo, el C2 se parece más a partidos en condiciones oficiales del jugador costarricense.

Enlaces refback

  • No hay ningún enlace refback.

Comentarios sobre este artículo

Ver todos los comentarios




Licencia de Creative Commons
Este obra está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 4.0 Internacional.

© 2017 Universidad de Costa Rica. Para ver más detalles sobre la distribución de los artículos en este sitio visite el aviso legal. Este sitio es desarrollado por UCRIndex y Open Journal Systems. ¿Desea cosechar nuestros metadatos? dirección OAI-PMH: https://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/index/oai