Revista de Biología Tropical ISSN Impreso: 0034-7744 ISSN electrónico: 2215-2075

OAI: https://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/rbt/oai
Why pygmy snails lay giant eggs: the kiwi syndrome
Pygmy snails, giant eggs Darwin edit CSC.pdf

Keywords

Punctum pygmaeum, egg size, predation, fecundity, Apteryx.

How to Cite

Monge-Nájera, J. (2020). Why pygmy snails lay giant eggs: the kiwi syndrome. Revista De Biología Tropical, (1), 1–3. https://doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v0i1.43811

Abstract

Some minute land snails lay disproportionally large eggs, and the reason is unknown. A possibility is the “Kiwi Syndrome”, in which natural selection pressures associated with low egg predation, heavy predation of the young, and a minimal viable size for hatchlings, force small females to invest in relatively large offspring at the cost of reduced fecundity.

https://doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v0i1.43811
Pygmy snails, giant eggs Darwin edit CSC.pdf

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